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The Best Places For An Architectural Photography Holiday

When you are traveling around the world, you can go on an architectural photography holiday that allows you to enjoy the world’s most beautiful buildings. You may choose to travel to the American Southwest where pueblos were built by indigenous tribes thousands of years ago. You can travel to Mexico to see the pyramids in the countryside, and you can travel to Africa if you want to see modern architecture juxtaposed against rain forests and deserts. However, the locations listed below should be first on your list.

Italy

When you travel to Italy, you can go to Rome to see the Coliseum, and you will see many old buildings that dot the capital. Plus, you can travel to many walled villages around the country that were built at different times. The walls of these villages are exquisite, and the cobblestone roads in each town lead you to buildings that have been used by the same families for hundreds of years.

You can travel into the Vatican to see the Basilica and other old buildings that were constructed by the church. Every town in Italy has a cathedral of some kind, and you can date the buildings based on how they are constructed. The Leaning Tower of Pisa is a modern marvel that leans without falling down, and you could travel to cliffside villages like Cinque de Terre and Positano or Portofino.

You can stay in castles for rent in Tuscany because they show you the architectural style of the area. You can travel up to Florence and down to Naples to learn how the royalty in those areas influenced the style of the region.

Japan

Japan is filled with temples from thousands of years of history. Because the samurai age did not end until World War II, every modern city has temples that have stood for centuries. Tokyo has been built in the shadow of Fujiyama, and the old temples are still a part of this bustling city.

You can take pictures of the amazing bridges that enter the tunnel under the harbor, and you can travel into the countryside where old villages have been inhabited by the same families for generations. Kyoto, Osaka, and Sapporo have integrated historic architecture into their city plans, or you can go to Nagano to see how the city grew after hosting the Winter Olympics.

In the present, you can see how Tokyo is expanding to host the Summer Olympics, and you can marvel at their new stadiums.

New York

New York has hosted every major architectural movement since the 1800s. The Empire State Building was once the tallest building in the world, old churches dot the city, and Art Deco buildings rise above every neighborhood. Plus, you can check out new buildings like the tower that has been built on the site of the old World Trade Center towers.

If you venture into every small neighborhood, you will notice brownstones that are over a century old, and you can enjoy shops that have been run by the same families since they immigrated to America. Even Central Park is a feat of architecture and engineering.

London

London is an historic city that was destroyed by a fire several hundred years ago. However, the city still has historic architecture that ranges from Buckingham Palace and the Tower of London to Big Ben and Westminster Abbey. London has several small boroughs that you can visit just to see old homes, and you will stumble upon new football stadiums that fit in with the city.

Plus, modern skyscrapers have become a part of London with the addition of locations like the Shard and the NatWest Tower. Additionally, you could go to Canary Wharf which has been featured on television many times. The city even built a beautiful airport in the middle of the River Thames that you can view from the boardwalks along the riverbanks.

Conclusion: Don’t Forget Paris

When you are traveling to the cities and towns on this list, you should not forget Paris. The Eiffel Tower is one of the great wonders of the modern world, and the city itself has many old buildings you can enjoy from Montmartre to the Arc de Triomphe. 

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